Aerion’s Dr. Richard Tracy on the biggest challenge for supersonic air travel

What do you think is the biggest challenge for supersonic air travel? Technical issues? Making the financials work? Dr. Richard Tracy, senior vice president & chief technology officer, Aerion, gave us his take.

Concorde was retired in 2003 but the idea of supsersonic travel has never quite left our imaginations. Although many are still cynical about whether the significant obstacles can be overcome, the race is on to make commercial supersonic air travel a reality again by the 2020s. Companies such as Boom, Lockheed Martin, Spike Aerospace and Aerion are all in the running.

Aerion recently announced that it will be working with GE Aviation on an engine for its AS2 supersonic business jet. This is a milestone and a step forward for the programme. Aerion has set a target of certifying the AS2 in 2021 and placing it into service in 2023.

I’m quite confident that we will see supersonic air travel again, certainly if we have anything to say about it.

By Dr. Richard Tracy, senior vice president & chief technology officer, Aerion

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